What’s On My Chromebook Shelf Right Now (August 2014)


Screenshot 2014-08-01 at 18.03.22

THE MOST USED APPS ON MY CHROMEBOOK, AND

WHY THEY’RE THERE

This is my latest Chrome OS shelf line up that I’ll probably stick with for at least the near future. While my iPhone and Google Nexus 7 Tablet are mainly used for leisure, my Chromebook is used mostly for work, I spend I’ve most of my day, it’s what I use to update this blog and work on various other projects. So I thought I’d do a post in the style of the what’s on my Mac Dock and why, but for Chromebooks, so here’s what’s on my Chromebook Shelf and why. First off we’ll cover some of the stock Chrome apps, and there are a few. The first is Chrome as it’s permanently placed on the Shelf by default, Files as it’s easier than having to go through the App Drawer to find it, finally I’ve got the Wallpaper Picker as it’s convenient for quickly changing my Desktop Wallpaper. Now onto the rest of my Apps.

  • Clock Calendar.  Clock Calendar adds a nice convenient Month view Calendar and Clock that can be used like a widget.

Screenshot 2014-05-04 at 08.51.31

  • Google Calendar. I Use Google Calendar on a daily basis, not always to add events. So it’s essential to have Calendar in easy reach.
  • Google Drive. It’s essential for me to always have quick access to all of my work with more advanced features than using Files.
  • Full Screen Weather. I use Full Screen Weather, because it’s always nice to keep an eye on the weather.
  • Google+ Photos. I use Google+ Photos as it’s a nice simple way to view all my photos that are backed up on Google+& even shared to Google+.
  • Google Play Music. I use Play Music as a lot of my music is already stored on Play Music, and having it on the Shelf makes it easy to use when I want to listen to anything.
  • Hangouts call. Hardly ever used, but it’s still there if I need it.
  • iCloud. I’ve replaced WeVideo with iCloud since I never did my Home Office Tour video, an since I’ve started using my iCloud email address as well as my Hotmail,Outlook & GMail addresses I thought that I might as well add it to my Shelf line up and maybe I’ll get some use out of the other iCloud features.
  • Notifier for Twitter. I’ve started using Notifier for Twitter as it adds pop-up Notifications via the Chrome OS Notification Centre. Even though Notifier for Twitter is a Chrome extension it has a pop down Twitter Client that can also be detached from Chrome and pinned to the Chrome OS Shelf as well as docked to the left or right edge of the Chrome Desktop. Currently I’m using Notifier for Twitter along side TweetDeck, but if I like the Notifier for Twitter Client over the TweetDeck Client I’ll probably switch to it full-time. I’ve stopped using Notifier for Titter as a Desktop Client, but I’ll still use it as a Desktop Notification service for Twitter.
  • Offline Dictionary. Offline Dictionary adds a nice hand searchable Dictionary that does what the name says and works while offline.
  • OMG Chrome. As it’s nice to keep an eye on the latest Chrome & Chrome OS news.
  • Spotify.  I like using Spotify & it’s nice to be able to use Spotify from the Shelf.
  • Sunrise Calendar. I’ve started to use Sunrise Calendar on my iPhone and the Android Beta on my Google Nexus 7 for review purposes, so I thought that it makes sense to use the Chrome/Chrome OS version as well and it has some nice extra features that you don’t get in Google Calendar, so Google Calendar has taken a back seat for now.
  • WeVideo. I’ve added WeVideo to my shelf as I’m planning on doing a tour of my Office/Desk at some point during the next week and thought that it would be an ideal time to experiment with WeVideo, so it’s gained a place on my shelf for at least the next few weeks.
  • TweetDeck by Twitter. I’ve still got TweetDeck on my Shelf despite hardly ever using it any more as I prefer Notifier for Twitter to TweetDeck just for the simple fact that Notifier for Twitter displays Chrome OS Notifications even when the App is closed. I’ve gone back to TweetDeck by Twitter as it’s far more simpler to use as a Desktop Client than Twitter Notifier.
  • Weather Now. I’ve replaced Full Screen Weather with Weather Now as Weather Now is clean and simple and displays like a Chrome OS Notification so it doesn’t take up the entire screen just to check the weather.

Screenshot 2014-07-09 at 17.39.45

  • WordPress.com. Since my blog is hosted on WordPress.com it makes sense to keep the WordPress.com app on the Shelf.
  • YouTube. I watch YouTube videos nearly every day, so keeping the YouTube app on the Shelf makes sense.
  • Google Play Music Mini Player. Having the Google Play Music Mini Player on the Shelf means that I can get access to some of the Google Play Music features without having to go into the Google Play Music app, would be nice to be able to use the Google Play Music Mini Player while the Google Play Music app is closed though.

That’s everything on my Chromebook Shelf. I’ve got loads of other apps on my Chromebook, but the list I’ve provided in this post are the select few that I use enough to allow to grace a spot on my Shelf. That’s enough about my Chromebook, what about you? Be sure to share your Chrome Shelf set-ups in the Comments.

Roland

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What’s On My Chromebook Shelf Right Now (Late May 2014)


Screenshot 2014-05-21 at 18.01.23

THE MOST USED APPS ON MY CHROMEBOOK, AND

WHY THEY’RE THERE

This is my latest Chrome OS shelf line up that I’ll probably stick with for at least the near future. While my iPhone and Google Nexus 7 Tablet are mainly used for leisure, my Chromebook is used mostly for work, I spend I’ve most of my day, it’s what I use to update this blog and work on various other projects. So I thought I’d do a post in the style of the what’s on my Mac Dock and why, but for Chromebooks, so here’s what’s on my Chromebook Shelf and why. First off we’ll cover some of the stock Chrome apps, and there are a few. The first is Chrome as it’s permanently placed on the Shelf by default, Files as it’s easier than having to go through the App Drawer to find it, finally I’ve got the Wallpaper Picker as it’s convenient for quickly changing my Desktop Wallpaper. Now onto the rest of my Apps.

  • Clock Calendar.  Clock Calendar adds a nice convenient Month view Calendar and Clock that can be used like a widget.

Screenshot 2014-05-04 at 08.51.31

  • Google Calendar. I Use Google Calendar on a daily basis, not always to add events. So it’s essential to have Calendar in easy reach.
  • Google Drive. It’s essential for me to always have quick access to all of my work with more advanced features than using Files.
  • Full Screen Weather. I use Full Screen Weather, because it’s always nice to keep an eye on the weather.
  • Google+ Photos. I use Google+ Photos as it’s a nice simple way to view all my photos that are backed up on Google+& even shared to Google+.
  • Google Play Music. I use Play Music as a lot of my music is already stored on Play Music, and having it on the Shelf makes it easy to use when I want to listen to anything.
  • Hangouts call. Hardly ever used, but it’s still there if I need it.
  • iCloud. I’ve replaced WeVideo with iCloud since I never did my Home Office Tour video, an since I’ve started using my iCloud email address as well as my Hotmail,Outlook & GMail addresses I thought that I might as well add it to my Shelf line up and maybe I’ll get some use out of the other iCloud features.
  • OMG Chrome. As it’s nice to keep an eye on the latest Chrome & Chrome OS news.
  • Spotify.  I like using Spotify & it’s nice to be able to use Spotify from the Shelf.
  • Sunrise Calendar. I’ve started to use Sunrise Calendar on my iPhone and the Android Beta on my Google Nexus 7 for review purposes, so I thought that it makes sense to use the Chrome/Chrome OS version as well and it has some nice extra features that you don’t get in Google Calendar, so Google Calendar has taken a back seat for now.
  • WeVideo. I’ve added WeVideo to my shelf as I’m planning on doing a tour of my Office/Desk at some point during the next week and thought that it would be an ideal time to experiment with WeVideo, so it’s gained a place on my shelf for at least the next few weeks.
  • WordPress.com. Since my blog is hosted on WordPress.com it makes sense to keep the WordPress.com app on the Shelf.
  • YouTube. I watch YouTube videos nearly every day, so keeping the YouTube app on the Shelf makes sense.
  • Google Play Music Mini Player. Having the Google Play Music Mini Player on the Shelf means that I can get access to some of the Google Play Music features without having to go into the Google Play Music app, would be nice to be able to use the Google Play Music Mini Player while the Google Play Music app is closed though.

That’s everything on my Chromebook Shelf. I’ve got loads of other apps on my Chromebook, but the list I’ve provided in this post are the select few that I use enough to allow to grace a spot on my Shelf. That’s enough about my Chromebook, what about you? Be sure to share your Chrome Shelf setups in the Comments.

Roland

Google+

Sunrise Calendar For iOS, Chrome/Chrome OS & Android Review


Sunrise-Calendar-Icon

 

After installing Sunrise Calendar on my Chromebook as well as my iPhone 4S & discovering that there is an Android version in Beta I thought I’d write a review of all three versions of Sunrise Calendar.

Sunrise Calendar for Chrome/Chrome OS

compared to the amount of different views in Google Calendar as Sunrise Calendar is a little lacking as it only has two views compared to the 5 in Google Calendar.

Sunrise Calendar Month view.

Sunrise Calendar Month view.

Sunrise Calendar Week view

Sunrise Calendar Week view

Google Calendar Day view

Google Calendar Day view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Calendar Week view

Google Calendar Week view

Google Calendar Month view

Google Calendar Month view

Google Calendar 4 Day view

Google Calendar 4 Day view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Calendar Agenda view

Google Calendar Agenda view

But where it’s got the edge over Google Calendar is the ability to have Google Calendar and iCalender in iCloud in the same Calendar along with Facebook Calendar and a few other services calendars all together, but unfortunately there is no option for a Microsoft Account (Hotmail, Live & Outlook) along with some built-in Sports fixture Calendars & Religious & National Holiday Calendars.

Sunrise Calendar in Chrome/Chrome OS is a more stylish option to Google Calendar if you rely on different Online Calendar services, but if you also use Microsoft Calender then you are left out in the cold.

Sunrise Calender on iOS

Like Sunrise Calendar in Chrome/Chrome OS Sunrise Calendar in iOS only has two views compared to the four in iOS Calendar.

Sunrise Calendar Agenda view

Sunrise Calendar Agenda view

Sunrise Calendar 3 Day view

Sunrise Calendar 3 Day view

iOS Calendar Agenda view

iOS Calendar Agenda view

iOS Calendar Week view

iOS Calendar Week view

iOS Calendar Month view

iOS Calendar Month view

 

 

iOS Calender Landscape Week view

iOS Calender Landscape Week view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But where it’s got the edge over iOS Calendar is the ability to have Google Calendar and iCalender in iCloud in the same Calendar along with Facebook Calendar and a few other services calendars all together, but unfortunately there is no option for a Microsoft Account (Hotmail, Live & Outlook) along with some built-in Sports fixture Calendars & Religious & National Holiday Calendars.

Sunrise Calendar in Chrome/Chrome OS is a more stylish option to Google Calendar if you rely on different Online Calendar services, but if you also use Microsoft Calender then you are left out in the cold.

Sunrise Calender compared to iCalendar in iCloud

When it comes to comparing Sunrise Calendar to iCalendar in iCloud there isn’t too much difference when it comes to views as iCalendar in iCloud only has one extra view.

Sunrise Calendar Month view.

Sunrise Calendar Month view.

Sunrise Calendar Week view

Sunrise Calendar Week view

iCalendar in iCloud Day view

iCalendar in iCloud Day view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

iCalendar in iCloud Week view

iCalendar in iCloud Week view

iCalendar in iCloud Month view

iCalendar in iCloud Month view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But where it’s got the edge over  iCalendar in iCloud is the ability to have Google Calendar and iCalender in iCloud in the same Calendar along with Facebook Calendar and a few other services calendars all together, but unfortunately there is no option for a Microsoft Account (Hotmail, Live & Outlook) along with some built-in Sports fixture Calendars & Religious & National Holiday Calendars.

Sunrise Calendar in Chrome/Chrome OS is a more stylish option to Google Calendar if you rely on different Online Calendar services, but if you also use Microsoft Calender then you are left out in the cold.

Sunrise Calendar Android Beta

Sunrise Calender for Android is only in a closed Beta at the moment and like sunrise Calendar on the other platforms has only got 2 views compared to the 4 views in the Android Calendar.

Sunrise Calendar Android Beta Agenda view

Sunrise Calendar Android Beta Agenda view

Sunrise Calendar Android Beta 3 Day view

Sunrise Calendar Android Beta 3 Day view

Android Calendar Day view

Android Calendar Day view

Android Calendar Agenda view

Android Calendar Agenda view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Android Calendar Month view

Android Calendar Month view

Android Calendar Week view

Android Calendar Week view

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But where it’s got the edge over the Android Calendar is the ability to have Google Calendar and iCalender in iCloud in the same Calendar along with Facebook Calendar and a few other services calendars all together, but unfortunately there is no option for a Microsoft Account (Hotmail, Live & Outlook) along with some built-in Sports fixture Calendars & Religious & National Holiday Calendars.

Sunrise Calendar in Chrome/Chrome OS is a more stylish option to Google Calendar if you rely on different Online Calendar services, but if you also use Microsoft Calender then you are left out in the cold.

Conclusion

Sunrise Calendar on all platforms is a nice alternative to the stock Calendars & really comes into its own is if you use Android, Chrome/Chrome OS & iOS as everything is nicely synced between all devices that have Sunrise Calendar installed.

Roland

Google+

What’s On My Chromebook Shelf Right Now (May 2014)


IMG_0180

THE MOST USED APPS ON MY CHROMEBOOK, AND

WHY THEY’RE THERE

I realize that its only been a few weeks since I last did a What’s on my Chromebook shelf right now post but there has been a few minor changes to my shelf setup.

While my iPhone and Google Nexus 7 Tablet are mainly used for leisure, my Chromebook is used mostly for work, I spend I’ve most of my day, it’s what I use to update this blog and work on various other projects. So I thought I’d do a post in the style of the what’s on my Mac Dock and why, but for Chromebooks, so here’s what’s on my Chromebook Shelf and why. First off we’ll cover some of the stock Chrome apps, and there are a few. The first is Chrome as it’s permanently placed on the Shelf by default, Files as it’s easier than having to go through the App Drawer to find it, finally I’ve got the Wallpaper Picker as it’s convenient for quickly changing my Desktop Wallpaper.

Now onto the rest of my Apps.

  • Dashboard. I use Dashboard as it adds a Mac OS X style Dashboard to Chrome OS. I’ve removed Dashboard as it’s now stopped working.
  • Clock Calendar. I’ve replaced Dashboard with Clock Calendar as Dashboard has stopped working, and Clock Calendar adds a nice convenient Month view Calendar and Clock that can be used like a widget.Screenshot 2014-05-04 at 08.51.31
  • Google Calendar. I Use Google Calendar on a daily basis, not always to add events. So it’s essential to have Calendar in easy reach.
  • Google Drive. It’s essential for me to always have quick access to all of my work with more advanced features than using Files.
  • Full Screen Weather. I use Full Screen Weather, because it’s always nice to keep an eye on the weather.
  • Google+ Photos. I use Google+ Photos as it’s a nice simple way to view all my photos that are backed up on Google+& even shared to Google+.
  • Google Play Music. I use Play Music as a lot of my music is already stored on Play Music, and having it on the Shelf makes it easy to use when I want to listen to anything.
  • Hangouts call. Hardly ever used, but it’s still there if I need it.
  • OMG Chrome. As it’s nice to keep an eye on the latest Chrome & Chrome OS news.
  • Spotify.  I like using Spotify & it’s nice to be able to use Spotify from the Shelf.
  • WeVideo. I’ve added WeVideo to my shelf as I’m planning on doing a tour of my Office/Desk at some point during the next week and thought that it would be an ideal time to experiment with WeVideo, so it’s gained a place on my shelf for at least the next few weeks.
  • WordPress.com. Since my blog is hosted on WordPress.com it makes sense to keep the WordPress.com app on the Shelf.
  • YouTube. I watch YouTube videos nearly every day, so keeping the YouTube app on the Shelf makes sense.
  • Google Play Music Mini Player. Having the Google Play Music Mini Player on the Shelf means that I can get access to some of the Google Play Music features without having to go into the Google Play Music app, would be nice to be able to use the Google Play Music Mini Player while the Google Play Music app is closed though.

That’s everything on my Chromebook Shelf. I’ve got loads of other apps on my Chromebook, but the list I’ve provided in this post are the select few that I use enough to allow to grace a spot on my Shelf. That’s enough about my Chromebook, what about you? Be sure to share your Chrome Shelf setups in the Comments.

Roland

Google+

Chrome OS In The Future


google-chromebook-logo With Samsung launching the Chromebook 2 in 11.6″ and 13″ varieties and the Education focused Chromebooks from new Chrome OS OEM’s Dell and Lenovo, what’s the future got in store for Chrome OS? The  Lenovo ThinkPad 11e yoga looks the most interesting of the new entrants to the Chromebook market, and could be the Chromebook that kickstarts the idea of having a Chrome OS Tablet in the future. We’ve already got Chromebooks, Chromeboxes & LG launching an iMac styled Chromebase then a Chrometab seems to be the obvious progression in the evolution of Chrome OS.

What I’d like to See in Chrome os in the future

With Google hinting at introducing an Easy Unlock feature, what would I like to see in the future of Chrome OS?

I’d like to see a way to integrate OneDrive, Box & Dropbox into the files app and improvements to the Offline capabilities of Google Drive.

Yesterday April 29 Acer announced an as yet unnamed Chromebook that will be powered by an intel Core i3-4005U running at 1.7GHZ and boast intel HD4400 grapics. as yet there is no word on a release date, price, amount of RAM or storage size, source OMG Chrome.

Roland

Google+

Other External Hardware That Works in Chrome OS


google-chromebook-logo

 

I was going through some of the external hardware that I’ve got lying around in my Windows Laptop bag to see what is compatible with Chrome OS and what isn’t compatible with Chrome OS.

Generic USB 2.0 webcam

 

I originally got this Webcam as an experiment using face tracking software for gaming which has sat in my Laptop bag ever since. So I decided to try it in my Chromebook, it works flawlessly in Hangouts call and is so much clearer than the built-in one and the 6 LED’s get rid of any artifacts created by low light. Unfortunately the Chrome OS Camera app doesn’t support the use of external Webcams, but the LED’s will help get rid of low light artifacts.

I don’t really use the built-in Webcam that much, so I won’t be using my external Webcam all that much, but it might come in handy if I attempt to do some Unboxing videos on YouTube.

Generic Wireless USB Mouse

I originally got this mouse because I’m not a fan of the tiny portable wired Mouse that came with the Laptop bag. For the small amount that I paid for it on eBay it’s an excellent Mouse. It works perfectly with Chrome OS, but yet again it’ll not get much use as I really like the gesture control of the multi-touch trackpad.

If I could get hold of an Apple cheaply on eBay I’d give it a go with my Chromebook as I’d like to re-setup a little office space in the Livingroom to get a comfortable work area than having my desk pretty much being my knee and the spare seat on the sofa.

Conclusion

Chrome OS is really good at supporting external hardware no matter how cheap or generic it is.

Planned Projects

I’m hoping to get a replacement HDD Caddy for my 2.5″ external HDD, as I’ve had my current one since about 2009/10 and it’s seen better days. I’m also considering upgrading the 16GB internal SSD by adding a 32GB SD card, whether I keep the SD card in the SD slot permanently or keep inserting it every time I take it out to use it I’ve not decided.

I’m hoping to do these over the weekend or in the week as I’ve got to order them on eBay and await delivery. I’ll not be doing any Articles on the’s upgrades but I might do a review of the SD Card and the HDD Caddy.

Roland

Google+

Why I Chose The Acer C720 Chromebook


google-chromebook-logo

I chose the Acer C720 Chromebook for  5 reasons:

  1. I wanted a Ultrabook style computer without having to pay a premium for a Windows 8 or MacBook Air, when all the time I spent on my Windows 7 Laptop was online and using Google Chrome.
  2. The Acer C720 Chromebook is the only Chromebook that looks like a Ultrabook.
  3. the price, at £198.99 The C720 is the cheapest of the Chromebook line and I didn’t want to break the bank on a second Laptop.
  4. The Acer C720 is more portable than the only other Intel based Chromebook, the HP Chromebook 14 and I didn’t want a Laptop with a comparable screen size to my Windows 7 Laptop that is 15.6″ as I wanted something that I could take everywhere with me.
  5. The Samsung Chromebooks along with the HP Chromebook 11 are nice looking but are a little over priced to say that they’re using Arm Processors.

I also thought for the price the Acer C720 Chromebook is pretty well specced for the price and looks as stylish as any of the Windows Ultrabooks that are out there. Why pay more for a HP or Samsung Chromebook that runs an Arm Processor when you can get a more powerful x86 Intel Processor based Chromebook for less than £200.00, I know that the HP Chromebook 14 is Intel based but as it’s a larger size than the Acer C720, Samsung & HP Chromebook 11 it’s not fair to include it in this comparison of Arm v Intel Chromebooks.

Roland

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