Using Chrome Remote Desktop For Gaming In Chrome OS


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In earlier Articles I’ve talked about using Chrome Remote Desktop for using Windows Programs in Chrome OS and for using Microsoft Visual Studio in Chrome OS. While wanting to use Windows Programs in Chrome OS is a slightly more mainstream than wanting to use Microsoft Visual Studio in Chrome OS, there is one area of Computing that’s not fully covered by Chrome OS equivalent web Apps is Gaming & this is where Chrome Remote Desktop really comes into its own, there’s no performance issues for playing built-in Windows Games, more advanced games might have a problem unless you’ve got a Multi-Core CPU, a dedicated Graphics Card and lots of RAM.
I’ve not had much time to experiment with Gaming through Chrome Remote Desktop, and will do a follow-up Article when I’ve had chance to experiment with Gaming via Chrome Remote Desktop, but doing the standard stuff like Programming and using Windows Programs on my aging Toshiba Laptop via my Acer C720 Chromebok via Chrome Remote Desktop is as smooth as using my Toshiba Laptop directly even when connecting over a 3G connection, but Gaming will need a high-speed connection that is as stable as your WiFi connection if you want to successfully Game using Chrome Remote Desktop over the Internet.
Roland

Google+

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Learning To Program In Microsoft Visual Studio: From A Chromebook & Chrome OS User


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While there is the Neutron Drive IDE Web App for Programming in Chrome OS, anyone who wants to learn how to Program in any or all the Languages that come as part of Visual Studio, it’s probably best to learn how to Program using Visual Studio since it’s the Industry Standard IDE for Programming.

But Visual Studio is expensive!!!! I hear you cry, well that may be true for the Professional & Ultimate Editions of Visual Studio which have been part of the Visual Studio line since 2005. visual Studio Express 2013 is composed of 3 different Editions (Visual Studio Express Web for Developing Web Applications, Visual Studio Express Windows for Developing Windows 8+ Modern UI Apps & Visual Studio Express Windows Desktop for Developing Traditional Windows Programs that run on all versions of Windows) There is also an Express Edition of  the server-side Version Control Team Foundation Server that also runs on Client Machines thanks to Windows built-in Web Server IIS. These Express Editions including Team Foundation Server are free to Download & use on as many Windows Desktops or Laptops as you like, Visual Studio 2013 only runs on Windows 8/8.1 so if you’re running Windows 7 then you will need Visual Studio 2012. Visual Studio Express takes all the complexity out of Visual Studio Professional or Ultimate.

Programming using Visual Studio & Chrome OS

The only way to Program using Visual Studio on Chrome OS requires a Windows Computer with Visual Studio installed along with the Chrome Web Browser & the Chrome Remote Desktop extension installed and the Chrome Remote Desktop installed on your Chrome OS computer. See my last Article for more on Chrome Remote Desktop.

Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 Windows Desktop Edition running on Chrome OS via Chrome Remote Desktop

Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 Windows Desktop Edition running on Chrome OS via Chrome Remote Desktop

Visual Studio runs just as smooth as if you were using it directly on your Windows computer over Chrome Remote Desktop when on a WiFi Network but it runs slightly slower when using a Mobile data connection, but this might show that there is some form of compression going on that’s not as noticeable when on WiFi.

Programming in Visual Studio while using Chrome OS gives you all the benefits of Chrome OS. This is true for any Programmer who wants to Program while away from home or the office, as they don’t have to take a heavy Laptop.

With Chromebooks being light and inexpensive compared to Windows Laptops, & Windows Ultrabooks of a comparable size and Wight being the same price if not more expensive than a regular Windows Laptop then a Chromebook makes the excellent companion  for a programmer especially when using Chrome Remote Desktop means that a Programmer doesn’t have to take their expensive Laptop on the road with them to Program.

Visual Studio Express is the perfect IDE for any novice Programmer as it allows you to install the correct tools for what you want to create.

  • If you want to create Web Apps then Visual Studio Express Web Edition is the right IDE for you.
  • If you want to create Windows 8 Modern Apps then Visual Studio Express Windows Edition is the right IDE for you.
  • If you want to create traditional Windows Programs then Visual Studio Express Windows Desktop Edition is the right IDE for you.

It’s even possible to install all three of the Visual Studio Express Editions if you require all three. If you’re a student and lucky enough to be able to get a Student MSDN Subscription then I’d suggest getting one of the none Express Editions of Visual Studio from there. (intact I’d recommend that any student that is able to get a Student MSDN Subscription gets all the downloads that they’re entitled to while they can).

Why I chose Microsoft Visual Studio Express Windows Desktop Edition

  I chose Microsoft Visual Studio Express Windows Desktop Edition because I’m currently interested in creating traditional Windows Desktop Programs not the Windows 8 Modern Apps or Web Apps. Once I’ve learnt how to write Programs in all the different Languages available in the Windows Desktop Edition I’ll move on to the Windows Edition before finally going on to the Web Edition.

I’ve always wanted to learn how to Program since Visual Studio Express originally came out in 2005 so learning to Program for the Windows Desktop was the obvious first step to take in the learning process for me, but for many of you that are reading this and are maybe thinking about learning to Program then the Visual Studio Web or Windows IDE’s might be more of what you’re into for your first step into Programming. (The downside to Programming for Windows & not the Windows Desktop is that you need to pay for a Developer Subscription to distribute your apps on the Windows Store, where as Windows Desktop Programs can be easily distributed  through Source Forge, Dropbox, Box, OneDrive & Copy meaning that you can get your Programs out there with little or no cost involved.)

I’ll do a follow-up Article at some point in the future.

Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 Windows Desktop Edition running on Chrome OS via Chrome Remote Desktop

Microsoft Visual Studio Express 2013 Windows Desktop Edition running on Chrome OS via Chrome Remote Desktop

Roland

Google+

MultCloud First Use & Initial Impressions


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I just wanted to get some form of a review out for this service while my Broadband connection isn’t stopping me from being able to use this service properly, so here’s my first impressions.

sign-up process

The sign-up process is simple and  straight forward, but as I’d originally set out to do a full review last week I forgot to get a Screenshot of the sign-up screen, but all you need to do is provide an email address, username and password to create your account.

Adding Cloud Storage Accounts & a look at the UI

Adding Cloud Storage Accounts to MultCloud is a simple process as the following four pictures show.

List of Cloud Storage Services 1

List of Cloud Storage Services 1

List of Cloud Services 2

List of Cloud Services 2

 

Select Your Chosen Cloud Service

Select Your Chosen Cloud Service

Enter your Account details

Enter your Account details

 

Click on the Add Account button on the left hand side of the MultCloud UI, then scroll through the list of services until you find the required one, select the service and click next, fill in your account details then click on the add button, authorize MultCloud with your chosen service then it shows up on the left hand side under the Add Account button.

The UI is clean and simple with a list of accounts down the left hand side along with an add button & then a list of folders taking up the right hand side of the screen like Google Drive with the top of the UI having basic buttons to download & upload files along with a create folder button, on first start the right hand side also has a list of your connected accounts.

First Start of MultCloud with duplicate Accounts list

First Start of MultCloud with duplicate Accounts list

Folder view of MultCloud

Folder view of MultCloud

 

Inside a Folder showing documents

Inside a Folder showing documents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On first impressions MultCloud looks like a very capable solution for working with multiple Cloud Storage Services, and I look forward to testing it out further and I’ll do a full review after I’ve had the chance to use it for a sustained amount of time.

Roland

Google+

Huawei E5330 Mobile Wi-Fi Modem Router Unboxing & First Impressions


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Firstly I’d like to say sorry for the somewhat poorly taken pictures but I didn’t have much time to take the unboxing pictures.

 Unbagging

In the Currier Shipping bag there was the device its self and a Contract Sim Pack.

Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 Box

Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 Box

Three UK Contract Sim Pack

Three UK Contract Sim Pack

 

Unboxing

I got this Mobile WiFi Modem Router from Three UK, and to say that I got it from a Carrier the box doesn’t have any Carrier branding on it what so ever apart from a Three Security Seal Sticker sealing the box closed.

The Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 sitting at the top of the box once opened

The Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 sitting at the top of the box once opened

Documentation under the cardboard tray that holds the Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 unit

Documentation under the cardboard tray that holds the Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 unit

 

All the documentation that came in the box

All the documentation that came in the box

Accessories in bottom of the box

Accessories in bottom of the box

 

Battery for the Mobile WiFi Hotspot

Battery for the Mobile WiFi Hotspot

Inside of the Mobile WiFi Hotspot

Inside of the Mobile WiFi Hotspot

 

Sim Card inserted

Sim Card inserted

Battery inserted

Battery inserted

 

All put together & powered on

All put together & powered on

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The reason that there was a second Sim Pack in the Shipping bag I assume is because I’m a Three Customer already and that the second line for the mobile WiFi is on an existing subscriber discount as the Mobile number on the second Sim Pack matches up with the Mobile number for the Sim Pack on the invoice as well as for the Mobile number on a welcome letter that I received from Three this morning.

First impressions

The Mobile WiFi unit is small and can easily slip in your pocket & it even fits nicely into the front pocket of my Targus Chromebook bag.

Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 Speeds

Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 Speeds

3G Speeds from my iPhone 4S

3G Speeds from my iPhone 4S

 

The speed from the Huawei Mobile WiFi E5330 Modem Router is faster than the speed I get from my iPhone 4S at home, so I think the Mobile WiFi Hotspot will get used more than my iPhone WiFi Hotspot while I’m away from my fixed line Broadband connection, but since I’ve got 1GB of tethering a month on my Phone Account and the 1GB of Mobile Broadband a month on my new Account that gives me a combined 2GB a month of Mobile Broadband to get online while I’m away which is plenty for my Chromebook, Google Nexus 7, Son’s Android Tablet and the wife’s iPhone 4S when were in a 2G only area.

I’ll do a full review in a month or two once I’ve had time to fully test the device.

Roland

Google+

WordPress Post Dashboard Clutter


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If like me you’ve used WordPress for nearly four years then this Post will feel close to home for you. I’ve Blogged via WordPress since September 2010 and have amassed 360 published Articles and two drafts and my All Posts Screen in the Posts Dashboard looks like this.

A sample page from my WordPress.com Posts Dsshboard

A sample page from my WordPress.com Posts Dashboard

Trying to navigate around all the posts is a bit hard when you’re looking at more than one or two pages, and in my opinion is in need of a revamp that lets you choose how you want to view all of your posts. I’d like to see something like having the ability to organize your posts into folders by year, then organized by month in each year folder then by week and for days that have multiple posts organized into a day folder, then just lump all the draft posts into the main All Posts Screen, doing this would also remove the need to have All Published, Sticky, Drafts and when there is a deleted post the Deleted tab and just have the root All tab and the Sticky tab as all  published Articles would be in Folders while all un published Articles would be in the All folder un organized.

With WordPress being a well used Platform with the free hosted WordPress.com service, hosted WordPress services and the free to download WordPress Platform at wordpress.org for anyone who wants to manage every aspect of their site and have it on a self hosted server you’d think that some form of Post Organization other than the tabbed layout of the Posts Dashboard would already have been implemented by now even if it was a simple Organize by Categories, Tags or both.

Don’t get me wrong as I think the free hosted wordpress.com service/wordpress.org download is a very capable Blog engine and brings a lot of features that are simply not available in Blogger, with an easier to navigate UI than Blogger Post/Article organization is on of the sorely missed features on ether of the two Blogging platforms along with on the wordpress.org download unless there is a post organization plug-in available for the server software.

Roland

Google+

What’s On My Chromebook Shelf Right Now (August 2014)


Screenshot 2014-08-01 at 18.03.22

THE MOST USED APPS ON MY CHROMEBOOK, AND

WHY THEY’RE THERE

This is my latest Chrome OS shelf line up that I’ll probably stick with for at least the near future. While my iPhone and Google Nexus 7 Tablet are mainly used for leisure, my Chromebook is used mostly for work, I spend I’ve most of my day, it’s what I use to update this blog and work on various other projects. So I thought I’d do a post in the style of the what’s on my Mac Dock and why, but for Chromebooks, so here’s what’s on my Chromebook Shelf and why. First off we’ll cover some of the stock Chrome apps, and there are a few. The first is Chrome as it’s permanently placed on the Shelf by default, Files as it’s easier than having to go through the App Drawer to find it, finally I’ve got the Wallpaper Picker as it’s convenient for quickly changing my Desktop Wallpaper. Now onto the rest of my Apps.

  • Clock Calendar.  Clock Calendar adds a nice convenient Month view Calendar and Clock that can be used like a widget.

Screenshot 2014-05-04 at 08.51.31

  • Google Calendar. I Use Google Calendar on a daily basis, not always to add events. So it’s essential to have Calendar in easy reach.
  • Google Drive. It’s essential for me to always have quick access to all of my work with more advanced features than using Files.
  • Full Screen Weather. I use Full Screen Weather, because it’s always nice to keep an eye on the weather.
  • Google+ Photos. I use Google+ Photos as it’s a nice simple way to view all my photos that are backed up on Google+& even shared to Google+.
  • Google Play Music. I use Play Music as a lot of my music is already stored on Play Music, and having it on the Shelf makes it easy to use when I want to listen to anything.
  • Hangouts call. Hardly ever used, but it’s still there if I need it.
  • iCloud. I’ve replaced WeVideo with iCloud since I never did my Home Office Tour video, an since I’ve started using my iCloud email address as well as my Hotmail,Outlook & GMail addresses I thought that I might as well add it to my Shelf line up and maybe I’ll get some use out of the other iCloud features.
  • Notifier for Twitter. I’ve started using Notifier for Twitter as it adds pop-up Notifications via the Chrome OS Notification Centre. Even though Notifier for Twitter is a Chrome extension it has a pop down Twitter Client that can also be detached from Chrome and pinned to the Chrome OS Shelf as well as docked to the left or right edge of the Chrome Desktop. Currently I’m using Notifier for Twitter along side TweetDeck, but if I like the Notifier for Twitter Client over the TweetDeck Client I’ll probably switch to it full-time. I’ve stopped using Notifier for Titter as a Desktop Client, but I’ll still use it as a Desktop Notification service for Twitter.
  • Offline Dictionary. Offline Dictionary adds a nice hand searchable Dictionary that does what the name says and works while offline.
  • OMG Chrome. As it’s nice to keep an eye on the latest Chrome & Chrome OS news.
  • Spotify.  I like using Spotify & it’s nice to be able to use Spotify from the Shelf.
  • Sunrise Calendar. I’ve started to use Sunrise Calendar on my iPhone and the Android Beta on my Google Nexus 7 for review purposes, so I thought that it makes sense to use the Chrome/Chrome OS version as well and it has some nice extra features that you don’t get in Google Calendar, so Google Calendar has taken a back seat for now.
  • WeVideo. I’ve added WeVideo to my shelf as I’m planning on doing a tour of my Office/Desk at some point during the next week and thought that it would be an ideal time to experiment with WeVideo, so it’s gained a place on my shelf for at least the next few weeks.
  • TweetDeck by Twitter. I’ve still got TweetDeck on my Shelf despite hardly ever using it any more as I prefer Notifier for Twitter to TweetDeck just for the simple fact that Notifier for Twitter displays Chrome OS Notifications even when the App is closed. I’ve gone back to TweetDeck by Twitter as it’s far more simpler to use as a Desktop Client than Twitter Notifier.
  • Weather Now. I’ve replaced Full Screen Weather with Weather Now as Weather Now is clean and simple and displays like a Chrome OS Notification so it doesn’t take up the entire screen just to check the weather.

Screenshot 2014-07-09 at 17.39.45

  • WordPress.com. Since my blog is hosted on WordPress.com it makes sense to keep the WordPress.com app on the Shelf.
  • YouTube. I watch YouTube videos nearly every day, so keeping the YouTube app on the Shelf makes sense.
  • Google Play Music Mini Player. Having the Google Play Music Mini Player on the Shelf means that I can get access to some of the Google Play Music features without having to go into the Google Play Music app, would be nice to be able to use the Google Play Music Mini Player while the Google Play Music app is closed though.

That’s everything on my Chromebook Shelf. I’ve got loads of other apps on my Chromebook, but the list I’ve provided in this post are the select few that I use enough to allow to grace a spot on my Shelf. That’s enough about my Chromebook, what about you? Be sure to share your Chrome Shelf set-ups in the Comments.

Roland

Google+

 

What’s On My Chromebook Shelf Right Now (July 2014)


Screenshot 2014-07-09 at 16.56.16

 

THE MOST USED APPS ON MY CHROMEBOOK, AND

WHY THEY’RE THERE

This is my latest Chrome OS shelf line up that I’ll probably stick with for at least the near future. While my iPhone and Google Nexus 7 Tablet are mainly used for leisure, my Chromebook is used mostly for work, I spend I’ve most of my day, it’s what I use to update this blog and work on various other projects. So I thought I’d do a post in the style of the what’s on my Mac Dock and why, but for Chromebooks, so here’s what’s on my Chromebook Shelf and why. First off we’ll cover some of the stock Chrome apps, and there are a few. The first is Chrome as it’s permanently placed on the Shelf by default, Files as it’s easier than having to go through the App Drawer to find it, finally I’ve got the Wallpaper Picker as it’s convenient for quickly changing my Desktop Wallpaper. Now onto the rest of my Apps.

  • Clock Calendar.  Clock Calendar adds a nice convenient Month view Calendar and Clock that can be used like a widget.

Screenshot 2014-05-04 at 08.51.31

  • Google Calendar. I Use Google Calendar on a daily basis, not always to add events. So it’s essential to have Calendar in easy reach.
  • Google Drive. It’s essential for me to always have quick access to all of my work with more advanced features than using Files.
  • Full Screen Weather. I use Full Screen Weather, because it’s always nice to keep an eye on the weather.
  • Google+ Photos. I use Google+ Photos as it’s a nice simple way to view all my photos that are backed up on Google+& even shared to Google+.
  • Google Play Music. I use Play Music as a lot of my music is already stored on Play Music, and having it on the Shelf makes it easy to use when I want to listen to anything.
  • Hangouts call. Hardly ever used, but it’s still there if I need it.
  • iCloud. I’ve replaced WeVideo with iCloud since I never did my Home Office Tour video, an since I’ve started using my iCloud email address as well as my Hotmail,Outlook & GMail addresses I thought that I might as well add it to my Shelf line up and maybe I’ll get some use out of the other iCloud features.
  • Notifier for Twitter. I’ve started using Notifier for Twitter as it adds pop-up Notifications via the Chrome OS Notification Centre. Even though Notifier for Twitter is a Chrome extension it has a pop down Twitter Client that can also be detached from Chrome and pinned to the Chrome OS Shelf as well as docked to the left or right edge of the Chrome Desktop. Currently I’m using Notifier for Twitter along side TweetDeck, but if I like the Notifier for Twitter Client over the TweetDeck Client I’ll probably switch to it full-time.
  • Offline Dictionary. Offline Dictionary adds a nice hand searchable Dictionary that does what the name says and works while offline.
  • OMG Chrome. As it’s nice to keep an eye on the latest Chrome & Chrome OS news.
  • Spotify.  I like using Spotify & it’s nice to be able to use Spotify from the Shelf.
  • Sunrise Calendar. I’ve started to use Sunrise Calendar on my iPhone and the Android Beta on my Google Nexus 7 for review purposes, so I thought that it makes sense to use the Chrome/Chrome OS version as well and it has some nice extra features that you don’t get in Google Calendar, so Google Calendar has taken a back seat for now.
  • WeVideo. I’ve added WeVideo to my shelf as I’m planning on doing a tour of my Office/Desk at some point during the next week and thought that it would be an ideal time to experiment with WeVideo, so it’s gained a place on my shelf for at least the next few weeks.
  • TweetDeck by Twitter. I’ve still got TweetDeck on my Shelf despite hardly ever using it any more as I prefer Notifier for Twitter to TweetDeck just for the simple fact that Notifier for Twitter displays Chrome OS Notifications even when the App is closed.
  • Weather Now. I’ve replaced Full Screen Weather with Weather Now as Weather Now is clean and simple and displays like a Chrome OS Notification so it doesn’t take up the entire screen just to check the weather.

Screenshot 2014-07-09 at 17.39.45

  • WordPress.com. Since my blog is hosted on WordPress.com it makes sense to keep the WordPress.com app on the Shelf.
  • YouTube. I watch YouTube videos nearly every day, so keeping the YouTube app on the Shelf makes sense.
  • Google Play Music Mini Player. Having the Google Play Music Mini Player on the Shelf means that I can get access to some of the Google Play Music features without having to go into the Google Play Music app, would be nice to be able to use the Google Play Music Mini Player while the Google Play Music app is closed though.

That’s everything on my Chromebook Shelf. I’ve got loads of other apps on my Chromebook, but the list I’ve provided in this post are the select few that I use enough to allow to grace a spot on my Shelf. That’s enough about my Chromebook, what about you? Be sure to share your Chrome Shelf set-ups in the Comments.

Roland

Google+